NANA Regional Corporation President/CEO to Retire in January 2015

NANA Regional Corporation, Inc. (NANA) announced the retirement of President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Kasaŋnaaluk Marie N. Greene, effective Jan. 1, 2015. 

“NANA shareholders and our region have benefited greatly under Kasaŋnaaluk’s 13 years of leadership,” said Nalikak Donald G. Sheldon, NANA’s board chairman. “Leadership positions require that the individual give up a great deal of personal time with family. I completely understand Marie’s decision to retire to spend more time with loved ones and cannot possibly thank her enough for her work at NANA.  Although she will be leaving this position, I know she will remain involved with our corporation and region for many years to come.”

Red Dog Mine celebrates 25 years

July 16, 2014 – Anchorage, Alaska – On Monday, the Red Dog Mine in Northwest Alaska held a celebration for mine employees in honor of its 25th anniversary. The mine is one of the largest zinc producers in the world and is often cited as a positive example of indigenous people and mining companies working together. Alaska Native Corporation, NANA Regional Corporation, Inc., owns the land on which the mine is situated and Teck Alaska, a subsidiary of Teck Resources Limited (Teck), is the operator.

Under ACES, oil taxes were like taking all of a salmon run

Rex A. Rock Sr.,Aaron Schutt,Sophie Minich,Helvi Sandvik,Jason Metrokin,Gail Schubert
July 9, 2014

Many Alaskans may wonder why six of the largest Native corporations have united behind the effort to defeat Ballot Measure 1. Those who know little about us might assume it’s because some of the coalition members have business interests aligned with the oil industry. But that is too simple an answer. We did not enter into this conversation lightly.

Read more at the Alaska Dispatch News

Get Out the Alaska Native Vote this Election

American Indians and Alaska Natives make up 19.5% of the overall state population, and 16.9% of Alaskans who are 18 and over.  Get out the Native Vote this election season.  Log on to www.aknativevote.com  and learn about how you can get involved!

ANCSA Regional Association responds to U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill

The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) Regional Association responded today to U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill inquiries targeting Alaska Native Corporations (ANCs) and their participation in federal government 8(a) contracting program.

From Many to One

Cooperation is not just an Iñupiaq value, it is one of the hallmarks of the NANA region. Northwest Alaska is known statewide for its collaborative efforts in advancing regional priorities like education, energy and health.

This commitment to cooperation is learned and passed down from generation to generation. Cooperation is what helped the region settle land claims with the State of Alaska and what led to the 1976 merger of the village corporations with NANA.

14(c)3 Lands

Under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, the village corporations received title to the surface estate in and around the village, subject to valid existing rights, as identified in Section 11 of the Act, as amended. Section 14(c)(3) provides that the village corporations convey (or give) to a municipal corporations (city), or the state in trust, lands identified for present and future community needs. The 14(c)3 provision is defined as a responsibility of the village corporations, but because 10 of 11 region villages merged with NANA in 1976 (see Merger Story) this obligation falls to NANA Regional Corporation.

NANA Elders Decide Which Lands to Save

Story originally appeared in the July/August Hunter, Volume 21 Number 6

In the early days after passage of ANCSA, the newly minted Alaska Native village and regional corporations were tasked with selecting what eventually became 44 million acres of land throughout Alaska.

For most Native people living in rural Alaska, the surrounding landscape was not something that was traditionally owned. However, ANCSA changed that. Suddenly Native people had to decide what lands they would own and also what lands they would give up.

Types of Land in the NANA Region

The NANA region encompasses 38,000 square miles in Northwest Alaska. Within this area, land is owned by two Alaska Native Corporations, state and federal government entities, businesses and individuals.

The ownership, or status, of land is dependent on laws such as the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA), the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA), the Alaska Native Allotment Act and the Alaska Statehood Act. There are some special terms that will help you better understand land status and land ownership in the region.

NANA Elects Board Officers and Subsidiary Board

April 17, 2014 – Anchorage, Alaska - NANA Regional Corporation, Inc.’s (NANA) Board of Directors elected the following board officers at their regular April board meeting.

2014 NANA Annual Meeting Door Prizes

March 18, 2014 – Kotzebue, Alaska - At the NANA Regional Corporation, Inc. (NANA) 2014 Annual Meeting, held March 17, 2014, in Shungnak, Alaska, drawings were held for door prizes for those present and those who turned in a valid proxy.  Checks will be mailed to winners who were not present at the meeting.

2014 NANA Shareholder Award Winners

Every year NANA honors four members of our NANA family with awards that recognize their contributions to the Iñupiat of Northwest Alaska, our communities and our corporation.

NANA Shareholders Elect Board Members

March 18, 2014 – Kotzebue, Alaska - On March 17, 2014, NANA Regional Corporation, Inc. (NANA) held its 2014 Annual Meeting of Shareholders in Shungnak, Alaska. During the meeting, the following board members were elected to serve three-year terms on the NANA board:

“Class C” Proposition FAQ

“Class C” Proposition FAQ

WHAT ARE “CLASS C” SHARES?
In 1988, ANCSA was amended to allow Alaska Native corporations to issue shares to people who met all of the requirements for Class A or Class B stock, but who were left off the BIA rolls for whatever reason (for example, some were adopted out of State and their adoptive parents didn’t enroll them).  In 1991, NANA amended its Articles of Incorporation to issue 100 shares of Class C Settlement Common Stock to each person who qualified.  The deadline to apply was December 31, 1995.

Deadline extended - Elder Advisor letters of interest

DEADLINE EXTENDED -  NANA Regional Corporation is looking for an elder advisor for a three year term to assist the board of directors. Candidates must be 62 years of age or older, fluent in Inupiaq, and must be a respected, positive role model with a strong foundation in the Inupiat Ilitqusiat. Please send a letter of interest by Friday, February 28, 2014. Send to NANA Regional Corporation, attention Shareholder Relations, or drop it off at your local NANA office. Taikuu.